Category Archives: Entrepreneurship

Madoo in Manhattan, PMP in Palm Beach

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The scene at Terry Allen Kramer’s Palm Beach home for a party for she hosted for Nicky Haslam’s new book, ” Nicky Haslam, A Designer’s Life.”

Article originally posted @ newyorksocialdiary.com

Last Monday evening the Madoo Conservancy of Sagaponack, NY held their second annual Madoo in Manhattan Robert Dash Garden Lecture at a private club on the Upper East Side. The guest speaker was Belgian landscape architect Peter Wirtz, CEO of Wirtz International, a family owned firm that has created residential, public and corporate landscapes in the US, Japan, Israel and Europe. They have designed the gardens at the Jardins du Carousel, and for people such as Catherine Deneuve, Valentino, the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland, and in 2013 they designed the remarkable sets for Raf Simon‘s Dior haute couture spring-summer collection.

In a lecture titled “A Landscape Architecture Rooted in Horticulture,” Wirtz walked the audience through fifteen landscapes each with its own set of challenges and innovative design solutions.

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Madoo in Manhattan was hosted by Frances Schultz, Chesie Breen, Mario Buatta, Madison Cox, Kendell Cronstrom, Christopher Gow, Janet Mavec, Marian McEvoy, Charlotte Moss, Deborah Nevins and Anne Raver.

Guests included: Suzanne Borghese, Judy Auchincloss, Leslie Rose Close, Jamee and Peter Gregory, Memrie Lewis, John Danzer, Mick Hales, Steven Gambrel, James Anderson, Warrie Price, Marshall Watson, Lindsey Taylor, Newell Turner, Jack Lenor Larsen, Paul Rogers, Ron Wendt, Anne Raver, Mark Epstein, Ryan McAllister, Christina and Alan MacDonald, Robert Scully, Diana Elghanayan, Martha McLanahan, and Andrea Filipone.

Petr Wirtz walked the audience through fifteen landscapes

Petr Wirtz walked the audience through fifteen landscapes

This annual lecture series honors the memory of Robert Dash a leading painter, poet and gardener of the East End who founded Madoo in 1967.

Sponsors for the evening included: Hunter Boot, Mecox, McKinnon and Harris, Phaidon, Ron Wendt Design, Seibert & Rice, The Topping Rose House and Whitmores.

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Roger Seifter, Randy Correll, Victoria Baran, Grant Marani, and Graham Wyatt

The Madoo Conservancy is dedicated to the study, preservation and enhancement of Madoo, the ever-changing horticulturally diverse garden with historic structures established in 1967 by artist, gardener and writer Robert Dash, in the Village of Sagaponack, New York. At Madoo, the unique living tribute to the artistic imagination of its founder we seek to continually engage, educate and inspire our visitors in this entirely organic environment. For more information visit: www.madoo.org.

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Judy Auchinchloss, Alejandro Saralegui, and Susanna Borghese

On Saturday, March 14, The Perlman Music Program (PMP) held its eighth annual concert and dinner at Kristy and Jim Clark‘s stunning Palm Beach home. Co-hosted by Emilia and Pepe Fanjul, and with over 250 music lovers and philanthropists in attendance, the event honored Toby and Itzhak Perlman‘s dedication to nurturing the next generation of classical music artists.

This special annual event is made possible through Kristy and Jim Clark’s profound generosity and dedication to The Perlman Music Program. “I was inspired when I first met Itzhak and Toby and learned about PMP,” said Jim Clark. “I went to Shelter Island, heard some of the concerts, and decided to encourage people in Palm Beach to get behind chamber music. An incredible amount of talent has come through their school–it’s turned into a big success.”

Perlman Music Program Group

Perlman Music Program Group

The evening began with cocktails and champagne on the veranda, followed by a performance in the Clarks’ elegant living room presented by several of PMP’s outstanding students and alumni. The concert included quartets by Beethoven and Schumann and a quintet by Mendelssohn, presented by violinists Mariella Haubs, Abigel Kralik, Nathan Meltzer, Doori Na, and Areta Zhulla; violists William Bender, Molly Carr, Matthew Lipman, and Jameel Martin; cellists Daniel Mitnitsky, Sebastian Stoger, and Brook Speltz; and pianist David Kadouch. The talented and poised performers introduced each piece and brought the composers to life in their own words.

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During the exceptional concert, Jim Clark moderated an informal Q&A with Toby Perlman. Their spirited conversation amongst these two friends ranged from the growth of the program over the past 21 years, the international reputation of the Program and its alumni, the beautiful Shelter Island campus where PMP calls home, to recent outreach in local Palm Beach schools. Toby concluded with thanks for Jim and Kristy, Emilia and Pepe Fanjul, and PMP Board members in attendance Jay Dweck and Vicki Kellogg, stressing that helping young musicians realize their gift is a responsibility shared by all. To bring the evening to a rousing close, the guests toasted the incredible music and beautiful weather at a festive dinner under the stars.

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How to give a modern update to period homes

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picture via modernlivingla.com

Furniture

Strange shapes for furniture can look strange in an older home. Go for furniture with clean lines. Too much plastic can look out of place as well, so try to stick with modern furniture that is made with traditional materials. For example, a modern sofa that sets low to the floor can add modern style without going over the top. Lounge chairs can be a very comfortable modern alternative to an old-fashioned recliner chair.

Get creative with fabric

 Modern fabric designs can complement a period home. You might want to avoid exceptionally bright colors though. Muted tones are a more tasteful option that can help modern patterns fit right into your beautiful older home. If you have some classic old furniture that you can’t part with, consider reupholstering it with a more modern fabric. Getting sample swatches and comparing them against the background of the room the chair is to go in can help ensure you are happy with the final fabric.

Get rid of old wallpaper

 Wallpaper can make a house look stuck in the past, not to mention that at a certain age it can appear dilapidated and unsightly. Try removing wallpaper and replacing it with a wall painted in a neutral tone. On this new background you can add artwork or decorations that add a modern look to your home. Think of this as your blank canvas that you can change the look of whenever you want to change the décor that hangs on it.

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Photo via modernlivingla.com

 Update rugs

 Modern rugs can do a lot to modernize a period home. The great thing is that you can change designs and colors as often as you want. Rugs offer a quick update as well. With many older homes having wood floors, a rug can add warmth and comfort as well. Don’t be afraid to try out a great new pattern. Many people are inspired by current runway fashion trends when adding texture and color to their home.

 Make a room look larger

Many rooms were made smaller in period homes. You can make a small space appear larger with tastefully chosen art work and furniture. Larger pieces of art on a wall and larger furniture can update a room and make it appear larger than it is. It is all about balance. Have small art prints framed in larger frames to make ceilings appear taller. Just be sure not to try to cram too much into a small room.

 Keep it simple

 When modernizing a home it can be easy to get caught up in the moment, with the end result being rooms that are too full of furnishings from many eras. Remember that your home will look better with furnishings that have a modern touch but don’t look out of place. If you have furnishings from five different decades you risk having a room that looks more like a yard sale than updated.

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A private tour sponsored by Stark of Renaissance artist Pieter Coecke van Aelst’s tapestries at the MET museum

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 Posted Originally by Tamara Stephenson
Run, don’t walk. over to Grand Design: Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Renaissance Tapestry” at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, an exhibit paying homage to a talented tapestry artist.
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close up views of these rich tapestries

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Museums make me happy, and it feels special to walk the halls taking in all that history together in one place.  Today, I’m giving thanks to interior designer Jamie DrakeParsons School of Design and Stark for inviting me to be part of a small, private tour to learn about the works of 16th Century Renaissance artist Pieter Coecke van Aelst.  The show is a collection of the artist’s elaborate tapestries made over the course of his career in the Netherlands. These kind of unique shows tell the stories of our past, and the art helps us to connect the dots about lifestyles during that time when other documentation may not be available.

We were fortunate to have the complete attention of museum curator Elizabeth Cleland who lead us on a detailed and mesmerizing tour.  Cleland meticulously comprised this artist’s lifetime collections from all over the world and showcases the majestic works throughout the Tisch Galleries on the 2nd floor of the museum.  Since this particular artist is relatively unknown there was much work to bring the exhibit together. The show marks the first single tapestry artist exhibit at the MET.  To see these works of art preserved and altogether in one expansive hall is awe inspiring.  I enjoyed hearing the stories of the labor and detailing that went into creating them as well.
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Pieter Coecke van Aelst’s painting, The Last Supper
Since the artist was first a painter it was valuable to see many of his paintings side by side with his tapestries, and the similar painterly qualities of the characters on his canvas were recreated on the tapestries with impressive artistry — this is no small feat.  Seeing many of these works completely intact and kept in pristine condition was equally impressive.
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The tapestries were created with wool, silk and gold and silver-metal wrapped thread, and created only after the artist made life size “cartoons” which were drawings and gouache and done in the finest details.
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“The pursuit of pleasure leads to misery and sorrow, for unbridled love blinds and deranges the heart”
inscription, Lust tapestry 

It is difficult to choose just one tapestry as my favorite, but if I had to pick one, I’d head over the gallery hall showcasing the 7 deadly sins (each sin has a dedicated tapestry boasting the enticing qualities of that particular sin). I must admit Lust stopped me in my tracks!

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My second favorite is the beautiful and lush depiction of the story of Vertumnus and Pomona. The gentleman’s pose, hat and the fabric drew us in, but the incredible detailing and foliage on the top of the tapestry made me wish there was a ladder available for closer inspection.
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 The exhibit is now open to the public at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 11.  Don’t take my word for it, make it a holiday outing and head on over to  witness the magic.  I promise you’ll leave inspired!  Additionally, Please see details below about a two day symposium sponsored by Stark and Jamie Drake in conjunction with Parsons School of Design to delve deeper into the exhibit…
The Symposium Internationally renowned scholars and curators present recent scholarship in themed sessions during this two-day event held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Parsons The New School for Design. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis, but is Free and open to the public.  For more information read here
Dates:
Saturday, January 10, 2015
10:30am-4:30pm
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium Free with Museum admission
and,
Sunday, January 11, 2015
10:00am–4:30pm
Parsons The New School for Design
John L. Tishman Auditorium, University Center 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City
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the crowned jewel of the exhibit and
the last on the tour at the end of the gallery is the large and impressive Adam & Eve
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more close up views from the show

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Happy Nesting
XO Tamara
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Rug Guide: Tips for Cleaning and Caring for Your Rug

Many of my friends have purchased Stark products over the last few years since I have been full time and every single one asks me how I recommend cleaning it. I figured this post originally from One Kings Lane might be helpful 🙂

Care instructions vary from rug to rug, but here are some general tips to keep in mind. For the best results, always refer to the care information that comes with your rug.

  • Rugs should be vacuumed without a beater bar. Some rugs, like tufted rugs, shed more than others. For these rugs, frequent vacuuming is a must.
  • Keep your rug out of direct sunlight to prevent colors from fading. If your rug is getting too much exposure, consider adding window treatments to shade the sun and keep colors bright.
  • To prevent your rug from showing wear, rotate it once a year. In higher-traffic areas, rotate your rug more often so it wears evenly. If your rug has constant exposure to the sun it will fade, but occasional rotation will equalize the effects.
  • How to treat spills depends on the material the rug is made of. But rule of thumb? Clean spills immediately. Always refer to the special care information included with your rug that Stark provides its clients.
  • For outdoor rugs, shake them to remove dirt, or hose them off with a garden hose. Then let them air-dry in the sun.
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Dreamweaver: Stark Carpet celebrates the art of rug making

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*post adapted from Editor at Large

Stark offered more than a look at its latest collections last Thursday at the Decoration & Design Building when the company hosted a special gathering to celebrate its new showroom. Guests were granted an intimate look at the fascinating rug-making craft while a Stark artisan wove a carpet on a traditional handloom during the event.

Invigorated from an extensive refresh of its showroom on the 11th floor, Stark played cheerful host, entertaining guests with Bellini’s, a DJ and, of course, a look at its wide collection of carpets.

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John Stark, Ashley Stark and Newell Turner

“Our new contemporary showroom represents the culmination of many years of work and many trips abroad working on product development directly with our sources,” said Senior Vice President Chad Stark. “Since I joined the company full-time three years ago, I, along with my cousin Ashley Stark, have been working to diversify our product offering to include the highest-end, fashion-forward handmade goods.”

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Chad Stark and Elizabeth Pyne

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Kate Kelly Smith, Steven Stark, Brenda Saget Darling and Karen Marks

“More than ever before, we have significant space devoted to rugs with a real wow factor,” he continued. “The response from our clients has been overwhelmingly positive. This new array of product is truly incredible, leading to a significant increase in that end of our business.”

As striking as it is innovative, Stark’s opulent new collection of contemporary rugs, such as Nairamat, features top quality Tibetan and Moroccan area rugs that are hand-woven from wool, silk, bamboo silk and jute.

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Sherrill Canet, Ashley Stark, Angela Jett and Clint Smith

“It’s fascinating because you see the handwork done along with how time- consuming it is to produce one of these rugs,” said Sherrill Canet who has designed rugs for Stark. “It’s quite a process.”

Notable attendees included members of the Stark family including John Stark, Andrea Stark, Steven Stark, Candice Stark, Chad Stark and Ashley StarkHouse Beautiful Editor in Chief Newell Turner, Hearst Senior Vice President Kate Kelly Smith, Veranda Advertising Manager Angela Jett and designers Caleb Anderson, Harry Heissman, Sherrill Canet and John Douglas Eason.

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Jon Walker, Leslie Miller, Edward Haleman, Angella Jett and Jean Luc Lenoir-Grieser

“The contemporary rug selections are an impressive and diverse mix of gorgeous colors, patterns and textures,” said Anderson. “Saturated abstract compositions, shimmering metallic weaves, neutral geometric—there is an elegant choice for any modern interior. The well-curated displays give an artistic visibility and ease to an otherwise overwhelming number of beautiful options.”

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DECORATING WITH WHITE

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photo via hgtv.com

When it comes to interior design there are few colors as timeless, adaptable or popular as white. It is fresh, minimalistic, pure and naturally beautiful, and it can make rooms appear light, airy and larger with minimal effort. When used in collaboration with other colors and shades, white can also be used to create some truly outstanding looks and atmospheres; a blend of neutral tones will give a calming and peaceful aura, whilst juxtaposing white against darker shades will create bold, dramatic interiors.

Interior design that incorporates, or heavily relies upon, white can also be really flexible; it can be painted over with ease, or contrasted with different colors to create stunning new looks. In fact, there are very few colors that don’t blend well with white, making it a treasured staple tone in most homes.

Paint the room white
Decorating with white couldn’t be easier, and there are a number of interior design ideas with white as the key shade. Nautical and coastal themes, contemporary styles, shabby chic and vintage/antique looks that draw on the classical and romantic eras all benefit from the use of white. These themes are relatively easy to achieve with the right accessories, furnishings and contrasting colors; inspiration for these fantastic themes can be found almost anywhere.

White is also great for those who don’t want to be overwhelmed by big blocks of color; utilizing white allows designers to subtly inject color into a room by way of bold accessories and furnishings. A room that is decorated neutrally is often easier to change, too – personality can be added or taken away, and the whole feel of a space can be altered with very little effort.

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photo via Veranda.com

Using white in the…
There are a number of ways in which white can be used around the home. In the kitchen, for example, white can be used to lighten and brighten surfaces and preparation areas, helping to keep the space cool and contemporary. Using white with contrasting colored tiles and accessories will give any kitchen a fresh and clean feel and will help to create some truly dramatic looks. Meanwhile, white is always a popular choice in bathrooms, reinforcing the idea of cleanliness and neatness. Again, colored tiles and accessories will really bring a bathroom out of its shell.

White isn’t simply confined to the more functional rooms in the house; it can also be used to make a living room, dining room, or bedroom feel much bigger than it is, truly making the most of the space on offer. Bedrooms can be transformed into ethereal, peaceful spaces with the careful use of white and a selection of accessories, such as white wooden shutters; homeowners can draw inspiration from the clouds to create a haven in which they can drift away, shutting out everything else. Living rooms can also benefit from a lick of white paint, which will allow accessories and furnishings to speak for themselves and ensure that a homeowner’s personality shines through.

Painting with a color as crisp and unforgiving as white can be daunting; there is always a risk that it will appear overbearing, or too clinical. However, when the decorating is carefully planned, with the right accompanying colors, textures and accessories, using white can ensure that interiors stay elegant and stylish for years to come.

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India-Nepal Business Trip 2014: Better than expected!

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Chad Stark at the Taj Mahal

I just spent the last 2 weeks traveling all over India and Nepal for work. To many, this opportunity sounds fun and exciting. However, I was dreading the trip since the day I found out I was going 6 months ago.

Recap of Trip #1 (2012)

This wasn’t my first time in India for business. 2 years ago I went on a 17-day trip to India to source handmade carpets and rugs. I attended the Veranasi Rug Fair, India’s largest annual rug trade show where 100s of carpet and rug vendors display their new product developments, and traveled with a former colleague whom I was not particularly fond of. We stayed in mediocre-at-best hotels with barely any Internet access. It was scorching hot, extremely smelly, and we worked 14-hour days every day for the entire trip – my colleague was the more experienced rug buyer since it was my first time traveling to source product so I followed his lead; I think he was trying to kill me. One experience I remember in particular was driving 2 hours each morning from our hotel to 6 or 7 different mills in the middle-of-no-where India, and then driving 2 hours back to the hotel in pitch black on unfinished roads with no traffic laws. Driving in India is crazy! I don’t know how there are not more accidents, but I was literally scared for my life!! Ultimately I did end up learning a lot about the products we sell but the overall experience was…questionable…. and it took a serious toll on my body making me sick for a couple weeks when I returned.

Trip #2 (2014)

I figured the trip this year was going to be similar except with better company; rather than traveling with this ex-employee who was trying to kill me, I was going to be with my uncle and CEO of Stark John, my partner-in-crime at the office Greg, and our new VP of Product Development whom I was just getting to know named Haynes. The trip was scheduled to be 14 days long instead of 17 so that was a good start. Also, I was traveling to Kathmandu, Nepal for a couple days where I had never been so that was exciting. Now that the trip is over, I can say that I was more than pleasantly surprised with how much I enjoyed the time away from our crazed NY office.

The group was, to say the least, very diverse. John and Greg both shared similar skepticism as I about India in regards to traveling at night and eating out of the hotels – we brought a combined 50+ protein bars in our luggage. Haynes had a different school of thought. Having lived in India for 3-months a year for the past 5 years working for a manufacturing company, Haynes loves India. He basks in the culture and is willing to eat just about anything! I shared his adventurousness to an extent but was also jaded by my previously bad experience in the country.

The first few days were not that day. When I arrived in Delhi on Saturday night, my friend who is from and lives in Delhi picked me up and took me to a nice traditional Indian restaurant called Bukhara. It was excellent. The next day I had a 530am flight with Greg and Haynes to visit a new potential supplier – the flight was 2 hours and then the drive was an additional 2 hours, so we spent 8 hours traveling and only 5 hours working. It was rough.

I was allowed to take the next day off to do something I’ve always dreamed about doing – seeing the Taj Mahal (see pic above). It took 4.5 hours each way in a car to get to Agra but the trip was well worth it. The Taj is an amazing site. I had an incredible tour guide who not only told me the history of the Taj Mahal and the Fort next door, but also took me through the town of Agra to see authentic jewelry and masonry artisans who still use some of the techniques found in the Taj. I bought a cool little ashtray as a souvenir. My guide even took me to a rug manufacturer once he learned what I do for a living! It was awesome.

Greg, Haynes, and I spent the following day visiting mills in a location 2 hours from our hotel where we selected products to present to John later that week; John decided he didn’t want to travel to those mills (smart man) so he rented a conference room at our hotel to review all our selections. One of his friends in the industry does this every time he comes to India so John figured he would give it a shot. After doing this once, I’m conformable saying the John never wants to travel to a mill again…it was very productive since we were able to review only the products we liked in an efficient and concise manner. The next stop was Nepal.

Although the travel schedule was intense, the country’s stench was strong, and the meals were non-existent other than early breakfast, late dinner, and protein bars, I could tell the trip was going to be different than last time. My last trip was really a buying trip with no free time where this one was more of a product development trip. The subtle difference is that instead of just buying things we saw, we spent a lot of time working with the manufacturers to develop new qualities, recolor existing qualities, and learn the technicalities of different woven structures to understand the capabilities of each loom and product type. This is Haynes’ specialty and I was fascinated. I quickly began comprehending the complexities of our product line: the difference between hand loomed product with and without a jacquard; the different types of hand knots and what makes them unique; yarn preparation methods and counts, etc.

Wearing in Kathmandu

Wearing in Kathmandu

The next stop was Kathmandu, Nepal, and I was blown away – what a beautiful city! Not only was the scenery spectacular but the people we so friendly and happy: all smiles all day. Plus there was no terrible smell! I was there for 4 days and it barely even felt like work – we worked 8-10 hours days but the time flew. On our last day we even played golf. There were monkeys on the course and everything! To control these monkeys, guards with slingshots were stationed on the course to shoot rocks at them whenever they came onto the fairway. One of the guards even let me shoot his slingshot. What an experience.

Hotel in Varanasi

Hotel in Varanasi

The next and last leg of the trip was what I was dreading most – Varanasi. However, we weren’t going to the trade show and John decided to shorten the trip by 1 day because of how product the trip had been. He also booked another conference room to have mills come visit us so we could see more people in less time. We only ended up traveling 2 hours from our hotel once and the drive back to the hotel at night wasn’t as bad as I remembered it being. It was still pretty bad, but I wasn’t as scared.

Conclusion

Overall, this trip was a success from both a personal and business standpoint. Not only did we develop and find some amazing products but I also learned much more on this trip than on my previous one. The food was actually a little better than I expected (even though we still ate all our protein bars) and having some free time to site-see and play golf really made the trip more fun. I also brought a video camera with me and filmed almost every aspect of carpet and rug making to make a documentary. More information on that to come!

I won’t say I’m excited to come back to India on this trip again, but I am definitely not as against it as I previously was. Plus, there are still some activities I need to do in India like go to Mumbai and Jaipur. I also discovered a bunch of activities that I need to do in Nepal like visit Pokhara and Everest Base camp. It’s a good thing I will be going to this part of the world at least once every 2 years for the next 10!

Great things to come in 2015 for Stark…keep an eye out!

Until next time,

Chad

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2014 is a very strong year for Interior Design

Interior Design (Post Originally from Editor at Large)

The Interior Design 2014 Outlook and State of the Industry, produced by the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) Research, forecasts 2014 will be one of the strongest years for residential spending since 2009. The data has indicated positive economic growth for the residential interior design sector.

With unemployment rates dropping to pre-January 2008 numbers, housing statistics improving, and consumers and commercial developers spending on renovation, remodeling and new construction, total industry sales have continued to increase and are up 2% for 2013, with an additional 6% increase forecasted for 2014.

“The effects of the recession hit the interior design industry in late 2008, with the number of practicing designers and interior design firms declining to pre-housing boom levels,” said Randy Fiser, executive vice president and CEO of ASID. “However, as highlighted in the first quarter Interior Design Billings Index (IDBI), the number of interior design firms is on track to grow 4% by the end of 2014. The data shows, between 2012 and 2022, total employment growth in the interior design industry (13%) is expected to outpace ‘all occupations’ (11%).”

Despite these statistics, enrollment in interior design education programs is down and only 15% of design firms plan to expand their staff. This data, coupled with an increase in the popularity of “DIY design,” suggest that the industry needs to communicate its value more effectively, according to ASID.

The Interior Design 2014 Industry Outlook report also examines the state of the design industry, including analysis of demographics, economic influences and macro trends that have the potential to significantly affect the industry. For 2014, these macro trends include urbanization, globalization, technology, a changing environment and the emergence of the millennial consumer.

Other trends addressed in the report include the evolution of collaborative workplaces; higher standards for resilient, sustainable, and environmentally friendly construction; healthy buildings; research or evidence-based design; 3-D modeling and printing; professional certification; and building information modeling (BIM).

“The state of the interior design industry is sound and promising,” said Fiser. “Designers are embracing new opportunities in technology and evidence-based design, and developing new design models for the way people live, work, play and heal in the 21st century.”

According to the study, to keep pace with this changing marketplace, design professionals in all career stages must continue to adapt to shifting industry trends and anticipate evolving consumer priorities.

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14 Ridiculous Home Accessories You Can’t Live Without

All of these inventions are pretty smart. I think I like #3 the most – would use it on the regular!

1. Egg Minder

Egg Minder
Quirky / Via Grand.Stgrandst.com

What it is: A Wi-Fi-enabled tray that tells you how many eggs you have and when they’re expiring.
Why you need it: How many times have you been at the grocery store and wondered how many eggs you have at home? At least ONCE, right?
How much it costs: $49, on sale from $79

2. Porkfolio

Porkfolio
Quirky / Via quirky.com

What it is: A piggy bank with an app that tracks how much the bank holds.
Why you need it: A heavy piggy bank can hold $5 of pennies or $100 of quarters. You need to know if you’re hitting up fast food or gourmet for dinner!
How much it costs: $49.99

3. Champagne Sabre

Champagne Sabre

Fab / Via fab.com

What it is: A sword for slicing the top off a bottle of champagne.
Why you need it: Nothing is more badass than going all ninja on a pricy champagne bottle. So Great Gatsby.
How much it costs: $149.95

4. Aros

Aros
Quirky / Via quirky.com

What it is: Wi-Fi and GPS sensitive air conditioner.
Why you need it: Aros learns as you use it, so it changes temperature based on the day of the week, time of the day, weather outside, where you currently are, and how much money it’s costing you to cool your house.
How much it costs: $300

5. Madison Fireplace

Madison Fireplace

Fab / Via fab.com

What it is: A standalone fireplace.
Why you need it: Nothing says “high life” like a fireplace in every room. With a standalone, you can just move the one fireplace into whatever room you’re in. It’s basically the same.
How much it costs: $399

6. Birillo Towel Stand

Birillo Towel Stand

Fab / Via fab.com

What it is: A shiny towel rack. Maybe the SHINIEST towel rack.
Why you need it: Only heathens put their towels on the floor.
How much it costs: $410, ya baller.

7. Diamond Clock

Diamond Clock

Fab / Via fab.com

What it is: A clock, shaped like a diamond.
Why you need it: Who doesn’t want to live in a turn-of-the-century bachelor pad?
How much it costs: $520

8. aFrame

aFrame
TruAudio / Via Grand.Stgrandst.com

What it is: A high-quality speaker disguised as a framed piece of art.
Why you need it: Even the most beautiful speakers look like speakers. UNTIL NOW.
How much it costs: A cool $600, no big.

9. Organic Wool Herringbone Blankets

Organic Wool Herringbone Blankets

Coyuchi / Via amazon.com

What it is: A king-sized throw.
Why you need it: It’s full-on “The Princess and the Pea.” How can you sleep with anything less than the best?
How much it costs: $1,098 (with free shipping)

10. Green Rainforest Marble Wall Fountain

Green Rainforest Marble Wall Fountain
Adagio / Via amazon.com

What it is: A marble wall with water cascading down it.
Why you need it: You’re a boss. Game, set, match.
How much it costs: $10,599

11. Pizza Station with Sneeze Guard

Pizza Station with Sneeze Guard
Bon Chef / Via amazon.com

What it is: A serving station for pizza and pizza-related condiments.
Why you need it: You don’t love pizza, you LIVE pizza. Pizza is your life — it should definitely be the focus of your dining room.
How much it costs: $16,282.20

12. Wedgwood Vase

Wedgwood Vase

Wedgwood / Via amazon.com

What it is: A vase that you shouldn’t put stuff in.
Why you need it: Nothing says “I’ve made it” like a vase on a pedestal with a display light.
How much it costs: $32,000

13. Lalique Rinceaux Full-Length Mirror

Lalique Rinceaux Full-Length Mirror
Lalique / Via finebrandsales.com

What it is: A mirror.
Why you need it: To look at yourself.
How much it costs: $30,600. Seriously.

14. Silver Leaf Chandelier

Silver Leaf Chandelier

Louie Lighting / Via louielighting.com

What it is: A 95-inch tall chandelier.
Why you need it: Chandelier = class. A 95-inch chandelier = 95 inches of class.
How much it costs: Are you sitting down? Sit down. $253, 998.

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